Adventures in Baking the Entire Athenian Acropolis, part 3

An update on my ongoing descent into madness: last night I made all (or at least, hopefully all; I have a fairly large lump of dough still in my fridge if it turns out I forgot something) the gingerbread I’ll need to assemble the monuments of the Acropolis.

The recipe I use is the one from Katy Blanchard’s famous cuneiform cookies, with some slight tweaks to the spices for my own personal taste. I’ve had great success using this recipe in the past to make Linear B cookies, engraved with words in the Mycenaean syllabic script, like these:

You can start with a mixer, but at some point you need to add the last of the flour to the dough by hand.

Take one lump at a time and roll it out nice and flat… I rolled the dough out directly onto a baking tray because I’m cutting a lot of neat, delicate shapes and I wanted to minimise the amount of movement and handling of the unbaked pieces.

Pieces of the Theatre of Dionysus and Odeion of Pericles…

Pieces of the citadel wall and Temple of Nike…

Pieces of the Parthenon, Erechtheion, and sanctuary enclosures of Zeus Polieus and Pandion…

Pieces of the Odeion of Herodes Atticus and Temple of Roma and Augustus…
(Also pictured: coping mechanism)
(Don’t drink while cooking, kids; DO NOT BE LIKE ME)

…and pieces of the Propylaea, Brauroneion, Chalkotheke and Pedestal of Agrippa.

Now I just have to put the damn thing together!

Part 4

4 thoughts on “Adventures in Baking the Entire Athenian Acropolis, part 3

  1. You weren’t kidding when you showed images of your planning notes, this must’ve taken some pretty thorough blueprints! Do you have an interest in architecture too, or is this par for the course for archaeologists?I struggle to wrap my head around the type of 3D thinking that this requires!

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    1. You’re right that this took a *lot* of planning, though. I did a practice run of the Parthenon and Erechtheion a couple of weeks ago, so I got a lot of pitfalls out of the way before the main event, and in the process figured out some shortcuts to measuring a lot of regular pieces that fit together nicely.

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